Blow hot, blow cold -- depending on the season

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Advertisement
Home » Research » Blow hot, blow cold -- depending on the season
Blow hot, blow cold -- depending on the season

By M4G Bureau - May 25, 2018

Findings from one research suggest that consumers respond more positively to emotionally warm messages if they are feeling physically cold, and emotionally cold messages if they are feeling physically warm

Findings from a research conducted by Prof. Valentyna Melnyk of the Massey Business School in New Zealand shows that consumers respond more positively to emotionally warm messages (those that incorporate feelings of love, joy and happiness) if they are feeling physically cold. Similarly, emotionally cold messages (those that use emotions like fear, loneliness, regret and disgust) will get a better response if the consumer is feeling physically warm.

A Voxy internet report states that Prof. Melnyk and her co-researchers drew on the homeostasis theory, which says that humans constantly strive for an optimum internal body temperature of 37 degrees Celcius, and neuroscience literature that suggests perceptions of physical temperature can be connected to emotions.

Prof. Melnyk says the research has several business implications, especially for the way products are marketed and packaged. She says businesses operating in countries with large seasonal temperature variations should choose emotionally cold advertising appeals during the summer months and emotionally warm appeals in winter. Similarly, the research suggests international advertising campaigns should be adapted for different climatic regions.

"Companies should not necessarily run the same advertising campaigns in Australia and Canada, even though the two countries are culturally and economically similar. A good example is Coca-Cola, which developed two very different Christmas ads. One really highlighted family and warmth, targeting northern hemisphere consumers where Christmas is during winter, while the other used a ‘cool vibe’ to target those in the southern hemisphere, including New Zealand, where Christmas is in summer."

 

Advertisement

Comments

Advertisement
Advertisement
Have You Say
Advertisement
Magazine Subscription